Is there a Dr. in the House? (ADLT 623 Reflection # 6)

As we delve into our own cultural analysis I’m not only intrigued but also a bit hesitant.  I’m intrigued to uncover the beliefs and values of some of my colleagues and co-workers but hesitant about how they may react to my inquiries.  It is also an act of balancing my own purpose as a student and how the information I gain my incline me to react given my position within my organization.  Schein stresses the many benefits to using and external reviewer when making inquiries that have the potential to be unsettling for those in the organization.  It will be very important for me to reinforce the purpose of my inquiry and to be careful about how I used the knowledge and insight that I gain.

The in-class exercise of generating questions which explore the concepts that reflect how our organizations achieve internal integration was helpful in conceptualizing how we will assess these concepts.  The other exercise, in which we each talking about how our respective organizations addresses one of the concepts, was revealing to say the least. I immediately started to realize how critical it will be to properly frame our questions and keep our inquiries diverse as to not indicate or project any self held beliefs about our organization’s culture.  When it came time for me to discuss, I immediately came to see how dysfunctional some aspects of my organizations culture seemed to others, and then to me.  This sort of revelation made me very curious about what the deep underlying assumptions are at my place of work.  It was humorous to an point, like listening to conversation at the Thanksgiving dinner table, but unnerving to think… ‘what is driving these actions and expressions’.  It helped to hear other perspectives and know that dysfunction, like with families, is not issue just with my organization.

Perhaps we need a ADLT 624 – Organizational Group Therapy and Recovery!

Image compliments of Photobucket.com

Image compliments of Photobucket.com